S&P/TSX Composite Index

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DEFINITION of 'S&P/TSX Composite Index'

The Canadian equivalent to the S&P 500 market index in the United States. The S&P/TSX Composite Index contains stocks of the largest companies on the Toronto Stock Exchange (TSX). The index is calculated by Standard and Poor's, and contains both common stock and income trust units. Additions to the index are generally based on quarterly reviews.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'S&P/TSX Composite Index'

The Toronto Stock Exchange is dominated by a lot of commodity stocks, most notably crude oil, due to the concentration of natural resources in Canada. Thus, the S&P/TSX Composite Index is more correlated to the fluctuation in commodity prices than its counterparts in the U.S.

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