S&P/Citigroup Broad Market Index (BMI) Global

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DEFINITION of 'S&P/Citigroup Broad Market Index (BMI) Global'

A market-capitalization-weighted index maintained by Standard and Poor's providing a broad measure of the global equities markets. The S&P/Citigroup Broad Market Index (BMI) Global includes approximately 11,000 companies in more than 52 countries covering both developed and emerging markets.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'S&P/Citigroup Broad Market Index (BMI) Global'

A country will be eligible for inclusion in the index if it has float-adjusted market capitalization of US$1 billion or more and its market capitalization weight is at least 40 basis points in either the emerging market or developed world indexes. A company will be eligible to be included in the index if it has float-adjusted market value of US$100 million or more, with a minimum of US$50 million value traded over the past 12 months.

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