Standard & Poor's - S&P

AAA

DEFINITION of 'Standard & Poor's - S&P'

The world's leading index provider and the foremost source of independent credit ratings. Standard & Poor's has been providing financial market intelligence to decision-makers for more than 150 years. In addition to Standard & Poor's Ratings Services and S&P Indices, the company has a third division, S&P Capital IQ, which provides data, research and analytics to institutional investors and investment advisors. Standard & Poor's was acquired by The McGraw-Hill Companies in 1966.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Standard & Poor's - S&P'

Standard & Poor's, which has offices in 23 countries, is known to investors worldwide for its wide variety of investable and benchmark indices, and the large number of credit ratings it issues. As of 2012, close to $5 trillion is indexed to the S&P 500 alone - which is easily the world's most followed stock index - with an additional $1.25 trillion directly indexed to Standard & Poor's family of indices. In 2010, Standard & Poor's issued over 162,000 new, and more than 556,000 revised, ratings.

VIDEO

Loading the player...
RELATED TERMS
  1. S&P 500 Dividend Aristocrats

    Companies that have had an increase in dividends for 25 consecutive ...
  2. S&P MidCap 400 Index

    This Standard & Poor's index serves as a barometer for the ...
  3. Spiders - SPDR

    A short form of Standard & Poor's depositary receipt, an ...
  4. Standard & Poor's 500 Index - S&P ...

    An index of 500 stocks chosen for market size, liquidity and ...
  5. S&P Core Earnings

    The Standard and Poor's revised version of the measurement of ...
  6. Ratings Service

    A company, such as Moody's or Standard & Poor's, that rates ...
RELATED FAQS
  1. How can I use the funds from operations to total debt ratio to assess risk?

    The funds from operations (FFO) to total debt ratio is used in fundamental analysis to determine a company's financial risk. ... Read Full Answer >>
  2. What are the highest-yielding investment grade bonds?

    The investment grade bonds with the highest yield are all corporate bonds rated either BBB or Baa, depending on the credit ... Read Full Answer >>
  3. What is the history of the S&P 500?

    The S&P 500 was introduced by Standard & Poor's in 1957 as a market index to track the value of 500 large corporations ... Read Full Answer >>
  4. How important is credit rating on a fixed income security?

    The credit rating on a fixed income security is an important factor for the determination of the yield and the amount of ... Read Full Answer >>
  5. What's the difference between an index fund and an actively managed fund?

    In investment, an index fund is a mutual fund intended to track the returns of a particular market index or benchmark as ... Read Full Answer >>
  6. How can I buy an S&P 500 fund?

    In 1976, Vanguard introduced individual investors to the first mutual fund designed to mimic the S&P 500 Index. Today ... Read Full Answer >>
  7. What's the difference between the Dow Jones Industrial Average and the S&P 500?

    The major difference between these two indexes is that the Dow Jones Industrial Average (DJIA) includes a price-weighted ... Read Full Answer >>
Related Articles
  1. Home & Auto

    A Brief History Of Credit Rating Agencies

    Credit rating agencies have a long history in this country. Learn about what they do and how were they developed.
  2. Retirement

    Don't Lose Your Shirt On Mutual Fund Sales

    Mutual funds aren't guaranteed profit-makers, but with the right calculations and timing, you can avoid major losses.
  3. Economics

    The ABCs Of Stock Indexes

    Indexes can track market trends, but they're not always reliable. Can you trust them?
  4. Investing

    The Number One Reason Why Most Traders Fail

    We show you the simple tools, availble to everyone, to succeed as an active trader: education, experience, charts, vision, and risk management systems.
  5. Investing

    Is There Still Opportunity in Japanese Stocks?

    Japanese stocks’ strong performance has prompted market watchers to question whether there’s still a case for adding exposure to the Land of the Rising Sun
  6. Credit & Loans

    Why Securities-Based Lending Became A Big Business

    Securities-based lending—using one's investments as collateral to secure a loan—has become big business for brokers and banks. Should we be concerned about its increasing popularity?
  7. Economics

    Do Transport Stocks Signal a U.S. Selloff?

    The Dow Jones Transportation Average index has underperformed the broader DJ Industrials Average, leading some market watchers to speculate a selloff.
  8. Investing Basics

    Explaining Counterparty Risk

    Counterparty risk is the risk that the other party in an agreement will default, or fail to live up to its contractual obligation.
  9. Investing

    What Can A Conference Call Tell About Trends?

    Messages in a company conference call can be easily misconstrued. But there is a way to cut through the talking points to get to the real substance.
  10. Investing

    Successful Investors Don’t Just Set It & Forget It

    The most highly effective investors consistently take steps to adapt their investment plan in the face of changing markets and changing lives.

You May Also Like

Hot Definitions
  1. OsMA

    An abbreviation for Oscillator - Moving Average. OsMA is used in technical analysis to represent the variance between an ...
  2. Investopedia

    One of the best-known sources of financial information on the internet. Investopedia is a resource for investors, consumers ...
  3. Unfair Claims Practice

    The improper avoidance of a claim by an insurer or an attempt to reduce the size of the claim. By engaging in unfair claims ...
  4. Killer Bees

    An individual or firm that helps a company fend off a takeover attempt. A killer bee uses defensive strategies to keep an ...
  5. Sin Tax

    A state-sponsored tax that is added to products or services that are seen as vices, such as alcohol, tobacco and gambling. ...
  6. Grandfathered Activities

    Nonbank activities, some of which would normally not be permissible for bank holding companies and foreign banks in the United ...
Trading Center
×

You are using adblocking software

Want access to all of Investopedia? Add us to your “whitelist”
so you'll never miss a feature!