Standard & Poor's - S&P

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DEFINITION of 'Standard & Poor's - S&P'

The world's leading index provider and the foremost source of independent credit ratings. Standard & Poor's has been providing financial market intelligence to decision-makers for more than 150 years. In addition to Standard & Poor's Ratings Services and S&P Indices, the company has a third division, S&P Capital IQ, which provides data, research and analytics to institutional investors and investment advisors. Standard & Poor's was acquired by The McGraw-Hill Companies in 1966.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Standard & Poor's - S&P'

Standard & Poor's, which has offices in 23 countries, is known to investors worldwide for its wide variety of investable and benchmark indices, and the large number of credit ratings it issues. As of 2012, close to $5 trillion is indexed to the S&P 500 alone - which is easily the world's most followed stock index - with an additional $1.25 trillion directly indexed to Standard & Poor's family of indices. In 2010, Standard & Poor's issued over 162,000 new, and more than 556,000 revised, ratings.

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