S&P/ASX 200 Index


DEFINITION of 'S&P/ASX 200 Index'

The benchmark stock index for the Austrailian markets. It was created for the sake of investment managers who held Australian securities and needed a sufficiently large and liquid portfolio with which they could compare their investment performance. The index trades on the Australian Stock Exchange under the symbol XJO.


The S&P/ASX 200 Index is composed of the S&P ASX 100 Index plus another 100 stocks. ASX mini futures 200 contracts are also based on this index. There is also an ETF that owns and tracks this index, along with futures contracts that trade with the index as their basis.

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