Special Revenue Fund

AAA

DEFINITION of 'Special Revenue Fund'

An account established by a government to collect money that must be used for a specific project. Special revenue funds provide an extra level of accountability and transparency to taxpayers that their tax dollars will go toward an intended purpose. Governments must rely on operating and capital budgets to pay for their other expenses.

BREAKING DOWN 'Special Revenue Fund'

For example, a city might establish a special revenue fund to pay expenses associated with storm water management. The money in this fund could only be used for storm water management costs, such as street sweeping, drain and ditch cleaning, system maintenance and public education. The city would be required to publicly report on where it collected the special revenue fund money from and how it spent the special revenue fund's budget.



RELATED TERMS
  1. Revenue

    The amount of money that a company actually receives during a ...
  2. Capital Funding

    The money that lenders and equity holders provide to a business. ...
  3. Operations Management

    Operations management refers to the administration of business ...
  4. Operating Revenue

    Income derived from sources related to a company's everyday business ...
  5. Performance Budget

    A budget that reflects the input of resources and the output ...
  6. Capital Budgeting

    The process in which a business determines whether projects such ...
Related Articles
  1. Insurance

    The Government And Risk: A Love-Hate Relationship

    Though the U.S. government can help its citizens by subsidizing risky loans, the costs always come back to the taxpayers.
  2. Insurance

    Top 6 U.S. Government Financial Bailouts

    U.S. bailouts date all the way back to 1792. Learn how the biggest ones affected the economy.
  3. Budgeting

    Current Account Deficits: Government Investment Or Irresponsibility?

    Deficit can be a sign of trouble for some countries, and of health for others. Find out what it means when more funds are exiting than entering a nation.
  4. Retirement

    Is The U.S. Government Too Big To Fail?

    Some think that the U.S. government is too big to fail, but one must only look at historical examples to know that it's not true.
  5. Retirement

    Navigating Government And Nonprofit Financial Statements

    Learn how to trace where your tax dollars and charitable donations are going.
  6. Professionals

    Examining A Career As An Auditor

    Stricter government regulations have put auditing professionals in demand.
  7. Economics

    Explaining Accounting Conservatism

    Accounting conservatism is a principal that requires accounting rules be applied with high degrees of verification.
  8. Term

    What are Non-GAAP Earnings?

    Non-GAAP earnings are a company’s earnings that are not reported according to Generally Accepted Accounting Principles.
  9. Insurance

    5 Ways to Lower Life Insurance Premiums

    Learn several effective methods for lowering life insurance premiums. These include quitting smoking and considering term life insurance.
  10. Budgeting

    The 7 Best Ways to Get Out of Debt

    Obtain information on how to put together and execute a plan to get out of debt, including the various steps and methods people use to become debt-free.
RELATED FAQS
  1. Where are the Social Security administration headquarters?

    The U.S. Social Security Administration, or SSA, is headquartered in Woodlawn, Maryland, a suburb just outside of Baltimore. ... Read Full Answer >>
  2. What is the Social Security administration responsible for?

    The main responsibility of the U.S. Social Security Administration, or SSA, is overseeing the country's Social Security program. ... Read Full Answer >>
  3. Is the Social Security administration a government corporation?

    The U.S. Social Security Administration (SSA) is a government agency, not a government corporation. President Franklin Roosevelt ... Read Full Answer >>
  4. What are some examples of general and administrative expenses?

    In accounting, general and administrative expenses represent the necessary costs to maintain a company's daily operations ... Read Full Answer >>
  5. How do dividend distributions affect additional paid in capital?

    Whether a dividend distribution has any effect on additional paid-in capital depends solely on what type of dividend is issued: ... Read Full Answer >>
  6. Why can additional paid in capital never have a negative balance?

    The additional paid-in capital figure on a company's balance sheet can never be negative because companies do not pay investors ... Read Full Answer >>

You May Also Like

Hot Definitions
  1. Recession

    A significant decline in activity across the economy, lasting longer than a few months. It is visible in industrial production, ...
  2. Bubble Theory

    A school of thought that believes that the prices of assets can temporarily rise far above their true values and that these ...
  3. Stock Market Crash

    A rapid and often unanticipated drop in stock prices. A stock market crash can be the result of major catastrophic events, ...
  4. Financial Crisis

    A situation in which the value of financial institutions or assets drops rapidly. A financial crisis is often associated ...
  5. Election Period

    The period of time during which an investor who owns an extendable or retractable bond must indicate to the issuer whether ...
  6. Shanghai Stock Exchange

    The largest stock exchange in mainland China, the Shanghai Stock Exchange is a nonprofit organization run by the China Securities ...
Trading Center
×

You are using adblocking software

Want access to all of Investopedia? Add us to your “whitelist”
so you'll never miss a feature!