Specific Risk

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DEFINITION

Risk that affects a very small number of assets. Specific risk, as its name would imply, relates to risks that are very specific to a company or small group of companies. This type of risk would be the opposite of an overall market risk, or systematic risk.


Sometimes referred to as "unsystematic or diversifiable risk."



INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS

An example of specific risk would be news that is specific to either one stock or a small number of stocks, such as a sudden strike by the employees of a company, or a new governmental regulation affecting a particular group of companies. Unlike systematic risk or market risk, specific risk can be diversified away.


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