Spiders - SPDR


DEFINITION of 'Spiders - SPDR'

A short form of Standard & Poor's depositary receipt, an exchange-traded fund (ETF) managed by State Street Global Advisors that tracks the Standard & Poor's 500 Index (S&P 500). Each share of spider contains one-tenth of the S&P index and trades at roughly one-tenth of the dollar-value level of the S&P 500. Spiders can also refer to the general group of ETFs to which the Standard & Poor's depositary receipt belongs.


Spiders are listed on the New York Stock Exchange (NYSE) after the acquisition of the American Stock Exchange (AMEX) under the ticker symbol SPY. By trading like stocks, spiders have continuous liquidity, can be short sold, bought on margin, provide regular dividend payments and incur regular brokerage commissions when traded.

Spiders are used by large institutions and traders as bets on the overall direction of the market. They are also used by individual investors who believe in passive management (index investing). In this respect, spiders compete directly with S&P 500 index funds.

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  1. What is a spider and why should I buy one?

    The term spider is the commonly-used expression to describe the the Standard & Poor's Depository Receipt (SPDR). This ... Read Full Answer >>
  2. What is the difference between iShares, VIPERs and Spiders?

    iShares, VIPERs and spiders each represent different exchange-traded fund (ETF) families. In other words, an individual company ... Read Full Answer >>
  3. Can mutual funds only hold stocks?

    There are some types of mutual funds, called stock funds or equity funds, which hold only stocks. However, there are a number ... Read Full Answer >>
  4. How do mutual funds compound interest?

    The magic of compound interest can be summed up as the concept of interest making interest. On the other hand, simple interest ... Read Full Answer >>
  5. Do mutual funds pay interest?

    Some mutual funds pay interest, though it depends on the types of assets held in the funds' portfolios. Specifically, bond ... Read Full Answer >>
  6. Why have mutual funds become so popular?

    Mutual funds have become an incredibly popular option for a wide variety of investors. This is primarily due to the automatic ... Read Full Answer >>

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