Spontaneous Assets

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DEFINITION of 'Spontaneous Assets'

The assets of a company that are accumulated automatically as a result of the firm's day-to-day business. These assets typically grow in proportion with sales. Examples may include increased inventory of goods for sale or accounts receivable.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Spontaneous Assets'

The projected growth in spontaneous assets is an important component for firms to consider as they evaluate the need to borrow additional funds.

Similar to spontaneous assets, spontaneous liabilities move with changes in sales.

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