Spontaneous Assets


DEFINITION of 'Spontaneous Assets'

The assets of a company that are accumulated automatically as a result of the firm's day-to-day business. These assets typically grow in proportion with sales. Examples may include increased inventory of goods for sale or accounts receivable.

BREAKING DOWN 'Spontaneous Assets'

The projected growth in spontaneous assets is an important component for firms to consider as they evaluate the need to borrow additional funds.

Similar to spontaneous assets, spontaneous liabilities move with changes in sales.

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  3. Net Liquid Assets

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  1. Can working capital be depreciated?

    Working capital as current assets cannot be depreciated the way long-term, fixed assets are. In accounting, depreciation ... Read Full Answer >>
  2. Do working capital funds expire?

    While working capital funds do not expire, the working capital figure does change over time. This is because it is calculated ... Read Full Answer >>
  3. How much working capital does a small business need?

    The amount of working capital a small business needs to run smoothly depends largely on the type of business, its operating ... Read Full Answer >>
  4. What does high working capital say about a company's financial prospects?

    If a company has high working capital, it has more than enough liquid funds to meet its short-term obligations. Working capital, ... Read Full Answer >>
  5. How can working capital affect a company's finances?

    Working capital, or total current assets minus total current liabilities, can affect a company's longer-term investment effectiveness ... Read Full Answer >>
  6. What can working capital be used for?

    Working capital is used to cover all of a company's short-term expenses, including inventory, payments on short-term debt ... Read Full Answer >>

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