Spot Rate

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What is the 'Spot Rate'

The price quoted for immediate settlement on a commodity, a security or a currency. The spot rate, also called “spot price,” is based on the value of an asset at the moment of the quote. This value is in turn based on how much buyers are willing to pay and how much sellers are willing to accept, which depends on factors such as current market value and expected future market value. As a result, spot rates change frequently and sometimes dramatically.

BREAKING DOWN 'Spot Rate'

In currency transactions, the spot rate is influenced by the demands of individuals and businesses wishing to transact in a foreign currency, as well as by forex traders. The spot rate from a foreign exchange perspective is also called the “benchmark rate,” “straightforward rate” or “outright rate.”

Besides currencies, assets that have spot rates include commodities (e.g., crude oil, conventional gasoline, propane, cotton, gold, copper, coffee, wheat, lumber) and bonds. Commodity spot rates are based on supply and demand for these items, while bond spot rates are based on the zero coupon rate. A number of sources, including Bloomberg, Morningstar and Thomson Reuters, provide spot rate information to traders.

Spot settlement i.e. the transfer of funds that completes a spot transaction, normally occurs one or two business days from the trade date, also called the horizon. The spot date is the day when settlement occurs. Regardless of what happens in the markets between the date the transaction is initiated and the date it settles, the transaction will be completed at the agreed-upon spot rate.

The spot rate is also used in determining a forward rate—the price of a future financial transaction—since a commodity, security or currency’s expected future value is based in part on its current value and in part on the risk-free rate and the time until the contract matures. Traders can extrapolate an unknown spot rate if they know the futures price, risk-free rate and time to maturity.

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RELATED FAQS
  1. How is a share premium account taxed?

    Understand the difference between a spot rate and forward rate. Learn why someone would enter into a contract with a spot ... Read Answer >>
  2. What are some securities that have spot rates?

    Learn about the types of assets that have spot rates, and understand how the spot rate is used to determine the fair market ... Read Answer >>
  3. How are commodity spot prices different than futures prices?

    Find out more about commodity spot and futures prices, how to calculate a commodity's futures price, and the differences ... Read Answer >>
  4. What is the difference between a forward rate and a spot rate?

    Learn about spot and forward contracts, how spot and forward rates are used for spot and forward contracts, and the difference ... Read Answer >>
  5. How do I convert a spot rate to a forward rate?

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