Spot Price

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DEFINITION of 'Spot Price'

The current price at which a particular security can be bought or sold at a specified time and place. A security's spot price is regarded as the explicit value of the security at any given time in the marketplace. In contrast, a securities futures price is the expected value of the security, in relation to its current spot price and time frame in question.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Spot Price'

Spot prices are most often used in relation to pricing of futures contracts of securities, typically commodities. In pricing commodity futures, the futures price is determined using the commodity's spot price, the risk free rate and time to maturity of the contract (along with any costs associated with storage or convenience). Using the same inputs, a security's spot price can also be determined given the futures price.

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