Spousal IRA



A type of individual retirement account that allows a working spouse to contribute to a nonworking spouse's retirement savings. A spousal IRA creates an exception to the provision that an individual must have earned income to contribute to an IRA. The working spouse's income, however, must equal or exceed the total IRA contributions made on behalf of both spouses.


To qualify to make spousal IRA contributions, the couple also must file a joint tax return. Spousal IRAs can be either traditional or Roth IRAs, and are subject to the same annual contribution limits, income limits and catch-up contribution provisions as traditional and Roth IRAs. While IRAs cannot be held jointly in both spouse's names, spouses can share their account distributions in retirement.

  1. Qualified Distribution

    Distributions made from a Roth IRA that are tax and penalty free. ...
  2. Required Minimum Distribution - ...

    The amount that Traditional, SEP and SIMPLE IRA owners and qualified ...
  3. Triggering Event

    1. A tangible or intangible barrier or occurrence that, once ...
  4. Reconversion

    A method used by individuals to minimize the tax burden of converting ...
  5. Ordering Rules

    The order in which Roth IRA assets are distributed. Assets are ...
  6. Non-Qualified Distribution

    1) A distribution from a Roth IRA that occurs before the Roth ...
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  1. What are the contribution limits for a Spousal IRA?

    The contribution limits for spousal IRAs change over time; for 2014, the limit for all IRAs was the lesser of $5,500 (or ... Read Full Answer >>
  2. How do I roll over a spousal IRA?

    “Rollover,” in regard to finances, generally means “transfer.” To roll over a spousal IRA, the assumption is that the spouse ... Read Full Answer >>
  3. My spouse has little/no income. Can I contribute to my spouse's IRA?

    Yes. You may make a Traditional IRA contribution to your spouse's Traditional IRA because you have eligible compensation. There ... Read Full Answer >>
  4. How can I determine if a longevity annuity is right for me?

    A longevity annuity may be right for an individual if, based on his current health and a family history of longevity, he ... Read Full Answer >>
  5. How does a Roth IRA grow over time?

    Your Roth IRA account grows over time thanks to two funding sources: contributions and earnings. While your contributions ... Read Full Answer >>
  6. Can my 401(k) be seized or garnished?

    As long as your retirement funds are held in your 401(k) and you do not take them as distributions, your 401(k) cannot be ... Read Full Answer >>

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