Spousal IRA



A type of individual retirement account that allows a working spouse to contribute to a nonworking spouse's retirement savings. A spousal IRA creates an exception to the provision that an individual must have earned income to contribute to an IRA. The working spouse's income, however, must equal or exceed the total IRA contributions made on behalf of both spouses.


To qualify to make spousal IRA contributions, the couple also must file a joint tax return. Spousal IRAs can be either traditional or Roth IRAs, and are subject to the same annual contribution limits, income limits and catch-up contribution provisions as traditional and Roth IRAs. While IRAs cannot be held jointly in both spouse's names, spouses can share their account distributions in retirement.

  1. Qualified Distribution

    Distributions made from a Roth IRA that are tax and penalty free. ...
  2. Roth IRA Conversion

    A reportable movement of assets from a Traditional, SEP or SIMPLE ...
  3. Reconversion

    A method used by individuals to minimize the tax burden of converting ...
  4. Ordering Rules

    The order in which Roth IRA assets are distributed. Assets are ...
  5. Non-Qualified Distribution

    1) A distribution from a Roth IRA that occurs before the Roth ...
  6. IRA Adoption Agreement And Plan ...

    A contract between the owner of an individual retirement account ...
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  1. What are the contribution limits for a Spousal IRA?

    The contribution limits for spousal IRAs change over time; for 2014, the limit for all IRAs was the lesser of $5,500 (or ... Read Full Answer >>
  2. How do I roll over a spousal IRA?

    “Rollover,” in regard to finances, generally means “transfer.” To roll over a spousal IRA, the assumption is that the spouse ... Read Full Answer >>
  3. My spouse has little/no income. Can I contribute to my spouse's IRA?

    Yes. You may make a Traditional IRA contribution to your spouse's Traditional IRA because you have eligible compensation. There ... Read Full Answer >>
  4. When can catch-up contributions start?

    Most qualified retirement plans such as 401(k), 403(b) and SIMPLE 401(k) plans, as well as individual retirement accounts ... Read Full Answer >>
  5. Who can make catch-up contributions?

    Most common retirement plans such as 401(k) and 403(b) plans, as well as individual retirement accounts (IRAs) allow you ... Read Full Answer >>
  6. Can you have both a 401(k) and an IRA?

    Investors can have both a 401(k) and an individual retirement account (IRA) at the same time, and it is quite common to have ... Read Full Answer >>

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