Squawk Box

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DEFINITION of 'Squawk Box'

An intercom speaker often used on brokers' trading desks in investment banks and stock brokerages. A squawk box allows a firm's analysts and traders to communicate with the firm's brokers.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Squawk Box'

Firms use squawk boxes to inform their brokers about current analyst recommendations, market events and information about block trades. This line of communication helps to keep brokers updated on important market factors and allows the firm to guide its brokers' trading. While many other forms of communication have arisen as a result of technology, the squawk box is still used in most investment banks and brokerages.

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