Stalwart

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DEFINITION of 'Stalwart'

A description of companies that have large capitalizations and provide investors with slow but steady and dependable growth prospects.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Stalwart'

The annual gain that would be viewed as the norm for investing in stalwarts is about 10% to 12%. Stalwarts will by no means become tenbaggers overnight, mainly because of their large capitalization, but they are usually a good source of fairly predictable returns.

Peter Lynch popularized this term in his book "One Up on Wall Street," where he shows that the price chart of a stalwart compares neither to a topographic map of Delaware nor to one of Mount Everest, but assumes a place somewhere in the middle.

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