Standalone Profit

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DEFINITION of 'Standalone Profit'

The profit associated with the operation of a single project or division of a firm. When measuring standalone profit, values are only included if they are directly generated from the activities of the project or firm.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Standalone Profit'

Standalone profits offer a method of valuing subsets of a business or the independent value of a project. It looks at the self-contained earning power of an entity by incorporating revenues and costs directly associated with the unit. This method determines the profit of a company as if it were made up of a series of completely independent operations.

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