Standalone Risk

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DEFINITION of 'Standalone Risk'

The risk associated with a single operating unit of a company or asset. Standalone involves the risks created by a specific division or project, which would not exist if operations in that area were to cease.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Standalone Risk'

Standalone risk measures the dangers associated with a single facet of a company's operations or by holding a specific asset. In portfolio management, standalone risk measures the undiversified risk of an individual asset. For a company, standalone risk allows them to determine a project's risk as if it were operating as an independent entity.

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