Staple Financing

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DEFINITION of 'Staple Financing'

A pre-arranged financing package offered to potential bidders in an acquisition. Staple financing is arranged by the investment bank advising the selling company and includes all details of the lending package, including the principal, fees and loan covenants. The name is derived from the fact that the financing details are stapled to the back of the acquisition term sheet.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Staple Financing'

Staple financing provides benefits in an acquisition. Because financing it already in place, it provides the seller with more timely bids. Buyers benefit from seeing the terms of the pre-arranged lending deal, and no longer need to scramble for last-minute financing. This method allows the bank to garner fees from both sides of the merger, providing advice to the seller and lending to the buyer. Because staple financing expedites the bidding process, it has become common in the merger and acquisition field, although some concerns have been expressed as to the ethics of an investment bank serving interests on both sides of a transaction.

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