What is 'Startup Capital'

Startup capital refers to the money that is required to start a new business, whether for office space, permits, licenses, inventory, product development and manufacturing, marketing or any other expense.


Startup capital is also referred to as "seed money."

BREAKING DOWN 'Startup Capital'

The money can come from a bank, in the form of a business loan; or from an investor, group of investors, or venture capitalist(s). In the case of a bank loan, the business will be expected to make monthly payments to pay down the debt plus any interest and/or fees. In the case of an investor, he or she will negotiate to provide that startup capital in exchange for a certain stake in the company.

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