State Capital Investment Corporation - SCIC

AAA

DEFINITION of 'State Capital Investment Corporation - SCIC'

A state-owned investment fund formed by the Communist Party of Vietnam in 2005 to invest in state enterprises. SCIC's stated goals as a sovereign wealth fund are to be an active shareholder in the state enterprises, to be a professional financial consultant and to earn returns that can be reinvested in the government.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'State Capital Investment Corporation - SCIC'

SCIC manages businesses in sectors including financial services, energy, manufacturing, telecommunications, transportation, consumer products, healthcare and information technology.




Vietnam, also referred to as the Socialist Republic of Vietnam, is a communist state with a centrally planned economy, but it has implemented economic reforms to introduce elements of the free market.



RELATED TERMS
  1. Privatization

    1. The transfer of ownership of property or businesses from a ...
  2. Self-Regulatory Organization - ...

    A non-governmental organization that has the power to create ...
  3. Free Market

    A market economy based on supply and demand with little or no ...
  4. Market Economy

    An economic system in which economic decisions and the pricing ...
  5. Sovereign Wealth Fund - SWF

    Pools of money derived from a country's reserves, which are set ...
  6. Discretionary Investment Management

    A form of investment management in which buy and sell decisions ...
Related Articles
  1. Sovereign Wealth Funds - Friend Or Foe?
    Investing Basics

    Sovereign Wealth Funds - Friend Or Foe?

  2. An Introduction To Sovereign Wealth ...
    Mutual Funds & ETFs

    An Introduction To Sovereign Wealth ...

  3. State-Run Economies: From Public To ...
    Personal Finance

    State-Run Economies: From Public To ...

  4. What is Globalization?
    Investing

    What is Globalization?

Hot Definitions
  1. Debit Spread

    Two options with different market prices that an investor trades on the same underlying security. The higher priced option ...
  2. Leading Indicator

    A measurable economic factor that changes before the economy starts to follow a particular pattern or trend. Leading indicators ...
  3. Wage-Price Spiral

    A macroeconomic theory to explain the cause-and-effect relationship between rising wages and rising prices, or inflation. ...
  4. Accelerated Depreciation

    Any method of depreciation used for accounting or income tax purposes that allows greater deductions in the earlier years ...
  5. Call Risk

    The risk, faced by a holder of a callable bond, that a bond issuer will take advantage of the callable bond feature and redeem ...
  6. Parity Price

    When the price of an asset is directly linked to another price. Examples of parity price are: 1. Convertibles - the price ...
Trading Center