State Administrator


DEFINITION of 'State Administrator'

The government agency or official who oversees and enforces state-level regulations regarding securities transactions. Model legislation called the Uniform Securities Act guides each state in setting its own laws for securities transactions that do not fall under federal regulation. The state administrator's job is to protect investors from securities fraud at the state level.

BREAKING DOWN 'State Administrator'

The state administrator essentially acts like the federal securities regulator, the Securities and Exchange Commission, on matters that do not fall under the SEC's purview. A state administrator's role includes the ability to bar, censure, restrict or suspend registered organizations or individuals who fail to adhere to the terms set forth in the Uniform Securities Act. These terms include willful securities violations, unethical business practices, felony convictions and other such infractions.

  1. Regulated Market

    A medium for the exchange of goods or services over which a government ...
  2. Securities And Exchange Commission ...

    A government commission created by Congress to regulate the securities ...
  3. Regulation Fair Disclosure - Reg ...

    A rule passed by the Securities and Exchange Commission in an ...
  4. Regulation T - Reg T

    The Federal Reserve Board regulation that governs customer cash ...
  5. Uniform Securities Act

    An act created as a starting point for state-level securities ...
  6. Regulation G

    A federal regulation that requires insured depository institutions ...
Related Articles
  1. Professionals

    Succeeding At The Series 63 Exam

    Your career as a securities agent begins with this test. We'll show you how to score high.
  2. Personal Finance

    Want To Know What Disclosures Mean ... In Plain English?

    Disclosures are the fine print in financial reports. We strip away the legal speak to tell you what they really mean.
  3. Investing Basics

    Policing The Securities Market: An Overview Of The SEC

    Find out how this regulatory body protects the rights of investors.
  4. Investing Basics

    What are the fiduciary responsibilities of board members?

    Find out what fiduciary duties a board of directors owes to the company and its shareholders, including the duties of care, good faith and loyalty.
  5. Economics

    How Bitcoin Helps People Bypass Government Currency Control

    Bitcoin has helped ordinary citizens in some countries bypass government controls over free exchange conversions.
  6. Economics

    What Bitcoin Regulations Look Like Around The World

    Bitcoin is still so new that countries are struggling to make legislation catch up with technology. Some nations are more open to virtual currency than others.
  7. Investing News

    What Affirmative Action Means for Businesses

    A look at what Affirmative Action means for your business.
  8. Investing

    Protect Your Creations--Register Your Trademark

    Federally registering your brand name or logo offers the broadest protection against potential trademark infringement.
  9. Markets

    Hillary Clinton Promises Free College and Higher Wages

    With income inequality on the rise, Hillary Clinton is running on raising the minimum wage, raising middle class wages, and providing free or low-cost college education.
  10. Economics

    How a Monopoly Works

    In economics, a monopoly occurs when one company is the sole (or nearly sole) provider of a good or service within an industry. This potentially allows that company to become powerful enough ...
  1. Does a company have to notify its investors when it faces legal proceedings?

    Not necessarily. The SEC guidelines do not require businesses to publicize legal proceedings if these proceedings are a part ... Read Full Answer >>
  2. Are UTMA accounts escheatable?

    Like most financial assets held by institutions such as banks and investment firms, UTMA accounts can be escheated by state ... Read Full Answer >>
  3. Can the IRS audit you after a refund?

    The U.S. Internal Revenue Service (IRS) can audit tax returns even after it has issued a tax refund to a taxpayer. According ... Read Full Answer >>
  4. How does escheatment impact a company?

    In recent years, state governments have become increasingly aggressive in enforcing escheatment laws. As a result, many businesses ... Read Full Answer >>
  5. What happens if property is wrongfully escheated?

    If your financial accounts, such as bank, investment or savings accounts, are declared dormant and the managing financial ... Read Full Answer >>
  6. How do financial advisors help you avoid escheatment?

    Financial advisors can help you avoid the escheatment of your financial assets by regularly reviewing all of your accounts, ... Read Full Answer >>

You May Also Like

Hot Definitions
  1. Bar Chart

    A style of chart used by some technical analysts, on which, as illustrated below, the top of the vertical line indicates ...
  2. Bullish Engulfing Pattern

    A chart pattern that forms when a small black candlestick is followed by a large white candlestick that completely eclipses ...
  3. Cyber Monday

    An expression used in online retailing to describe the Monday following U.S. Thanksgiving weekend. Cyber Monday is generally ...
  4. Take A Bath

    A slang term referring to the situation of an investor who has experienced a large loss from an investment or speculative ...
  5. Black Friday

    1. A day of stock market catastrophe. Originally, September 24, 1869, was deemed Black Friday. The crash was sparked by gold ...
Trading Center