Stated Annual Interest Rate


DEFINITION of 'Stated Annual Interest Rate'

The return on an investment that is expressed as a per-year percentage, and that does not account for compounding that occurs throughout the year. The effective annual interest rate, on the other hand, does account for intra-year compounding that can occur on a daily, monthly or quarterly basis. Typically, the effective annual interest rate will lead to higher returns than the stated annual interest rate due to the power of compounding. Investors can compare products and calculate which type of interest will offer the most favorable return.

BREAKING DOWN 'Stated Annual Interest Rate'

A $10,000, one-year certificate of deposit with a stated annual interest rate of 10% will earn $1,000 at maturity. If the money was placed in an interest-earning savings account that paid 10% compounded monthly, the account will earn interest at a rate of 0.833% each month (10% divided by 12 months; 10/12 = 0.833). Over the course of the year, this account will earn $1,047.13 in interest, at an effective annual interest rate of 10.47%, which is notably higher than the returns on the 10% stated annual interest rate of the certificate of deposit used in the example.

  1. Nominal Interest Rate

    The interest rate before taking inflation into account. The equation ...
  2. Annualized Rate

    A rate of return for a given period that is less than one year, ...
  3. Fixed Interest Rate

    An interest rate on a liability, such as a loan or mortgage, ...
  4. Interest Rate Ceiling

    The maximum interest rate that a financial institution can charge ...
  5. Compounding

    The ability of an asset to generate earnings, which are then ...
  6. Variable Interest Rate

    An interest rate on a loan or security that fluctuates over time, ...
Related Articles
  1. Bonds & Fixed Income

    Accelerating Returns With Continuous Compounding

    Investopedia explains the natural log and exponential functions used to calculate this value.
  2. Investing Basics

    Overcoming Compounding's Dark Side

    Understanding how money is made and lost over time can help you improve your returns.
  3. Investing Basics

    APR and APY: Why Your Bank Hopes You Can't Tell The Difference

    Banks use these rates to entice borrowers and investors. Find out what you're really getting.
  4. Savings

    Turn Small Savings Into A Big Nest Egg

    Small changes to spending and saving habits can reap major rewards - with limited sacrifice.
  5. Investing Basics

    Interest Rates And Your Bond Investments

    By understanding the factors that influence interest rates, you can learn to anticipate their movement and profit from it.
  6. Mutual Funds & ETFs

    4 Mutual Funds Warren Buffet Would Buy

    Learn about four mutual funds Warren Buffett would invest and recommend to his trustee, and discover detailed analysis of these mutual funds.
  7. Investing News

    4 Value Stocks Worth Your Immediate Attention

    Here are four stocks that offer good value and will likely outperform the majority of stocks throughout the broader market over the next several years.
  8. Mutual Funds & ETFs

    The 4 Best Buy-and-Hold ETFs

    Explore detailed analyses of the top buy-and-hold exchange traded funds, and learn about their characteristics, statistics and suitability.
  9. Investing

    How ETFs May Save You Thousands

    Being vigilant about the amount you pay and what you get for is important, but adding ETFs into the investment mix fits well with a value-seeking nature.
  10. Bonds & Fixed Income

    High Yield Bond Investing 101

    Taking on high-yield bond investments requires a thorough investigation. Here are looking the fundamentals.
  1. What licenses does a hedge fund manager need to have?

    A hedge fund manager does not necessarily need any specific license to operate a fund, but depending on the type of investments ... Read Full Answer >>
  2. Can mutual funds invest in hedge funds?

    Mutual funds are legally allowed to invest in hedge funds. However, hedge funds and mutual funds have striking differences ... Read Full Answer >>
  3. When are mutual funds considered a bad investment?

    Mutual funds are considered a bad investment when investors consider certain negative factors to be important, such as high ... Read Full Answer >>
  4. What fees do financial advisors charge?

    Financial advisors who operate as fee-only planners charge a percentage, usually 1 to 2%, of a client's net assets. For a ... Read Full Answer >>
  5. What is a stock split? Why do stocks split?

    All publicly-traded companies have a set number of shares that are outstanding on the stock market. A stock split is a decision ... Read Full Answer >>
  6. How do I place an order to buy or sell shares?

    It is easy to get started buying and selling stocks, especially with the advancements in online trading since the turn of ... Read Full Answer >>

You May Also Like

Hot Definitions
  1. Section 1231 Property

    A tax term relating to depreciable business property that has been held for over a year. Section 1231 property includes buildings, ...
  2. Term Deposit

    A deposit held at a financial institution that has a fixed term, and guarantees return of principal.
  3. Zero-Sum Game

    A situation in which one person’s gain is equivalent to another’s loss, so that the net change in wealth or benefit is zero. ...
  4. Capitalization Rate

    The rate of return on a real estate investment property based on the income that the property is expected to generate.
  5. Gross Profit

    A company's total revenue (equivalent to total sales) minus the cost of goods sold. Gross profit is the profit a company ...
  6. Revenue

    The amount of money that a company actually receives during a specific period, including discounts and deductions for returned ...
Trading Center
You are using adblocking software

Want access to all of Investopedia? Add us to your “whitelist”
so you'll never miss a feature!