Statement Stuffer

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DEFINITION of 'Statement Stuffer'

A type of sales brochure included in a customer's account statement. Most statement stuffers include some sort of short application and information about other financial services that the customer can obtain. Statement stuffers provide a convenient and cheap form of marketing additional products and services to financial customers.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Statement Stuffer'

Statement stuffers are used by all types of financial institutions. Banks, brokerage firms and insurance companies all use this form of marketing, as well as tax and accounting firms. These stuffers can market such items as mutual funds, various types of insurance, money management services or other products, such as CDs and savings accounts.

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