Statistics Canada (StatsCan)

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DEFINITION of 'Statistics Canada (StatsCan)'

Canada's government agency responsible for producing statistics for a wide range of purposes, including the country's economy and cultural makeup. Most notably, Statistics Canada conducts the Canadian census every five years. The organization is part of Canada's Industry Portfolio, a group of 11 government organizations tasked with helping to build a knowledge-based economy within Canada and generally promoting economic and job growth.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Statistics Canada (StatsCan)'

Broadly, Statistics Canada focuses on collecting statistics dealing with the Canadian agriculture, environment, health, prices, industries, social conditions, travel and tourism. The results from these tests are used to gauge the general health and trend of the Canadian economy.

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