Statistics

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DEFINITION of 'Statistics'

A type of mathematical analysis involving the use of quantified representations, models and summaries for a given set of empirical data or real world observations. Statistical analysis involves the process of collecting and analyzing data and then summarizing the data into a numerical form.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Statistics'

Statistics is a general term used to summarize a process that an analyst, mathematician or statistician can use to characterize a data set. If the data set is based on a sample of a larger population, then the analyst can extend inferences onto the population based on the statistical results from the sample.

Some statistical measures include regression analysis, mean, kurtosis, skewness, analysis of variance and variance.

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