Statutory Voting

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DEFINITION of 'Statutory Voting'

A corporate voting procedure in which each shareholder is entitled to one vote per share and votes must be divided evenly among the candidates or issues being voted on. Statutory voting, sometimes known as straight voting, is one of two stockholder voting procedures and the more common option. In statutory voting, if you owned 50 shares and were voting on six board positions, you could cast 50 votes for each board member, for a total of 300 votes. You could not cast 20 votes for each of five board members and 200 for the sixth.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Statutory Voting'

The other voting procedure is cumulative voting, which lets shareholders weight their votes toward particular candidates and improves minority shareholders' chances of influencing voting outcomes. In cumulative voting, you are allowed to vote disproportionately, so if you own 50 shares and are voting on six board positions, you can cast 300 votes for one director and none for the five other directors, 20 votes for each of five board members and 200 for the sixth, or any number of other combinations. To find out whether a company uses statutory voting or cumulative voting, consult its stockholder agreement.

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