Stem The Tide

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DEFINITION of 'Stem The Tide'

An attempt to stop a prevailing trend. Sometimes referred to as "stop the bleeding."

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Stem The Tide'

If a stock is continually falling, stemming the tide would be an attempt to halt the free fall and change its direction.

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