Sterling Ratio

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DEFINITION of 'Sterling Ratio'

A ratio used mainly in the context of hedge funds. This risk-reward measure determines which hedge funds have the highest returns while enduring the least amount of volatility. The formula is as follows:

Sterling Ratio



This formula uses the average for risk (drawdown) and return over the past three years. Drawdown is calculated at the maximum potential loss in the given year.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Sterling Ratio'

Just like the Calmar ratio, a higher Sterling ratio is generally better because it means that the investment(s) are receiving a higher return relative to risk.

The Sterling ratio is similar to the Sharpe ratio and the Sortino ratio, as it also produces a risk-adjusted return measurement. The Sterling ratio, along with the Sortino ratio, is primarily used by hedge funds as a way of advertising superior risk management.

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