Stimulus Package

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DEFINITION of 'Stimulus Package'

A package of economic measures put together by the government to stimulate a floundering economy. The objective of a stimulus package is to reinvigorate the economy and prevent or reverse a recession by boosting employment and spending. The theory behind the usefulness of a stimulus package is rooted in Keynesian economics, which argues that the impact of a recession can be lessened with increased government spending.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Stimulus Package'

The global recession of 2008-2009 led to unprecedented stimulus packages being unveiled by governments around the world. In the United States, the $787-billion stimulus package dubbed the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 contained a huge array of tax breaks and spending projects aimed at vigorous job creation and a swift revival of the U.S. economy.

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  4. Stimulus Check

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RELATED FAQS
  1. How do government stimuli increase the number of jobs in the private sector?

    The purpose of a government stimulus is to use strategic government spending to revive a stagnant or contracting economy. ... Read Full Answer >>
  2. Where does stimulus economics come from?

    Depending on which type of economist you talk to, stimulus economics originated from the ideas of either a book published ... Read Full Answer >>
  3. Do stimulus checks work?

    In theory, stimulus checks are intended to increase the amount of capital in the economy. By giving back tax dollars in ... Read Full Answer >>
  4. How do government-issued stimulus checks affect the economy?

    Stimulus checks are payments given to individuals by the government based on taxes paid in the previous year. The hope is ... Read Full Answer >>
  5. How does neoclassical economics relate to neoliberalism?

    While it may be likely that many neoliberal thinkers endorse the use of (or even emphasize) neoclassical economics, the two ... Read Full Answer >>
  6. What are the main risks to the economy of a country that has implemented a policy ...

    The main risk to the economy of a country that has implemented a policy of austerity is the potential for a self-reinforcing, ... Read Full Answer >>
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