Stimulus Package

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DEFINITION of 'Stimulus Package'

A package of economic measures put together by the government to stimulate a floundering economy. The objective of a stimulus package is to reinvigorate the economy and prevent or reverse a recession by boosting employment and spending. The theory behind the usefulness of a stimulus package is rooted in Keynesian economics, which argues that the impact of a recession can be lessened with increased government spending.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Stimulus Package'

The global recession of 2008-2009 led to unprecedented stimulus packages being unveiled by governments around the world. In the United States, the $787-billion stimulus package dubbed the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 contained a huge array of tax breaks and spending projects aimed at vigorous job creation and a swift revival of the U.S. economy.

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