STIR Futures & Options


DEFINITION of 'STIR Futures & Options'

An acronym standing for "short-term interest rate" options or futures contract.

BREAKING DOWN 'STIR Futures & Options'

Many companies and financial institutions use STIR contracts to hedge against borrowing or lending exposure.

  1. Clearing House

    An agency or separate corporation of a futures exchange responsible ...
  2. Option

    A financial derivative that represents a contract sold by one ...
  3. Interest Rate

    The amount charged, expressed as a percentage of principal, by ...
  4. Hedge

    Making an investment to reduce the risk of adverse price movements ...
  5. Put-Call Parity

    A principle that defines the relationship between the price of ...
  6. Maturity

    The period of time for which a financial instrument remains outstanding. ...
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  1. Can mutual funds invest in options and futures?

    Mutual funds invest in not only stocks and fixed-income securities but also options and futures. There exists a separate ... Read Full Answer >>
  2. How do futures contracts roll over?

    Traders roll over futures contracts to switch from the front month contract that is close to expiration to another contract ... Read Full Answer >>
  3. How does a forward contract differ from a call option?

    Forward contracts and call options are different financial instruments that allow two parties to purchase or sell assets ... Read Full Answer >>
  4. Why do companies enter into futures contracts?

    Different types of companies may enter into futures contracts for different purposes. The most common reason is to hedge ... Read Full Answer >>
  5. What does a futures contract cost?

    The value of a futures contract is derived from the cash value of the underlying asset. While a futures contract may have ... Read Full Answer >>
  6. What are the main risks associated with trading derivatives?

    The primary risks associated with trading derivatives are market, counterparty, liquidity and interconnection risks. Derivatives ... Read Full Answer >>

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