Stock Jobbing

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DEFINITION of 'Stock Jobbing'

The buying and selling of securities with the intent of generating quick profits. While most investors seek value through long-term investments, stock jobbing takes on a more speculative short-term tone.

BREAKING DOWN 'Stock Jobbing'

The term stock jobbing is largely used in reference to the South Sea Bubble - an 18th-century stock that literally wiped out the savings of many British citizens.

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RELATED FAQS
  1. Is there a difference between financial spread betting and arbitrage?

    Financial spread betting is a type of speculation that involves a highly leveraged derivative product, whereas arbitrage ... Read Full Answer >>
  2. Why do companies enter into futures contracts?

    Different types of companies may enter into futures contracts for different purposes. The most common reason is to hedge ... Read Full Answer >>
  3. How can an investor profit from a fall in the utilities sector?

    The utilities sector exhibits a high degree of stability compared to the broader market. This makes it best-suited for buy-and-hold ... Read Full Answer >>
  4. What is the benefit of the Modified Internal Rate Of Return (MIRR)?

    The modified internal rate of return (MIRR) is a financing metric used in business capital budgeting. Its primary benefit ... Read Full Answer >>
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    Even though the internal rate of return metric is popular among business managers, it tends to overstate the profitability ... Read Full Answer >>
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