Straight Line Basis

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DEFINITION of 'Straight Line Basis'

A method of computing amortization (depreciation) by dividing the difference between an asset's cost and its expected salvage value by the number of years it is expected to be used.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Straight Line Basis'

Also known as straight line depreciation or straight line amortization, this is the simplest deprecation method. Basically, it just spreads out the cost of an asset equally over its lifetime.

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