Streetable

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DEFINITION of 'Streetable'

A company that has a management team with enough strength and experience to run a public company. It's imperative for Wall Street to have confidence in a company's management - otherwise it will be difficult, if not impossible, for that company to go public.

BREAKING DOWN 'Streetable'

For a company, being "streetable" means that it is of high enough quality to have the respect of The Street. Although individuals are the ones who come to eventually own companies (either directly or through mutual funds), a company must first impress the investment bankers and those on Wall Street to make it to the market.

This term was sent by Greg Bohlen, managing director of Wasatch Advisors Venture Investments.

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