Stretch Loan

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DEFINITION of 'Stretch Loan'

A loan that is extended to another party, either an individual or subsidiary company, that requires a large proportion of the party's cash flows to service the loan on a monthly basis. Usually, this benchmark is 50% of the party's gross income or more.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Stretch Loan'

Stretch loans are extended to those individuals or companies that are in dire need of financing. Due to the relatively higher default and financial risk, lenders may require collateral or a large initial down payment before making a stretch loan.

RELATED TERMS
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