Strong Buy

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DEFINITION of 'Strong Buy'

A type of stock purchasing recommendation given by analysts for a stock that is expected to dramatically outperform the average market return and/or the return of comparable stocks in the same sector or industry. It is an analyst's emphatic endorsement of a stock.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Strong Buy'

'Strong buy' is the strongest recommendation that an analyst can give to purchase a stock. As with any type of analyst rating, the rating is only relevant until a material event occurs that results in the analyst changing his or her outlook regarding the company.

A 'strong buy' means the analyst believes the stock's underlying company is or will soon be experiencing positive financial performance and/or favorable market conditions.

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