Structured Finance

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DEFINITION of 'Structured Finance'

A service that generally involves highly complex financial transactions offered by many large financial institutions for companies with very unique financing needs. These financing needs usually don't match conventional financial products such as a loan.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Structured Finance'

Structured finance has become a major segment in the financial industry since the mid-1980s. Collateralized bond obligations (CBOs), collateralized debt obligations (CDOs), syndicated loans and synthetic financial instruments are examples of structured financial instruments.

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