Structured Note

What is a 'Structured Note'

A structured note is a debt obligation that also contains an embedded derivative component with characteristics that adjust the security's risk/return profile. The return performance of a structured note will track that of the underlying debt obligation and the derivative embedded within it.

BREAKING DOWN 'Structured Note'

A structured note is a hybrid security that attempts to change its profile by including additional modifying structures. A simple example would be a five-year bond tied together with an option contract. This structure would work to increase the bond's returns.

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