Stump The Chump

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DEFINITION of 'Stump The Chump'

The act of challenging a person in the spotlight in an attempt to make he or she appear foolish. "Stump the chump" employs tactics such as trying to make the hostile party look smart and in control while trying to make the other person look incompetent. Examples of trying to stump a chump include asking an authority or expert who is giving a presentation a question that they won't be able to answer and that could undermine their credibility, or giving a coworker incorrect information that will cause them to reach incorrect conclusions.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Stump The Chump'

A presenter who finds him or herself being heckled by someone trying to "stump the chump" can try to diffuse the situation in a number of ways. These include refusing to become hostile, regardless of the questioner's attitude; remaining upbeat and unflustered, at least outwardly; trying to win the aggressor over by seeking out points of agreement and using humor.

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