Style Analysis

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DEFINITION

The process of determining what type of investment behavior an investor or money manager employs when making investment decisions. Virtually all investors subscribe to a form of investment philosophy, and a prudent analysis of a money manager's style needs to be performed before an investor can determine whether the manager will be good fit for his or her personal investment goals and preferences.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS

There is virtually an unlimited number of investment styles; however, some of the most common types of investment styles are categorized as growth investing, value investing, large cap investing, small cap investing and active trading.

Some money managers change their investment styles over time, opting to go with one approach while it is working well and then switching to another when the old approach seems to be losing its luster.


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