Subject Offer

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DEFINITION of 'Subject Offer'

Subject offers are intended to be purely informational in nature. They can be used in some instances to elicit a counteroffer from a willing buyer. Rather than placing an asset immediately into the market for sale, a subject offer enables one to asses the demand environment.

BREAKING DOWN 'Subject Offer'

A subject offer is not a firm commitment to sell. It is subject to receiving a counteroffer, which may later be followed by a sale. Subject offers are commonly used in the bargaining process of a transaction.

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