Subsequent Offering

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DEFINITION of 'Subsequent Offering'

An offering of additional shares after the issuing company has already had an initial public offering (IPO). In a subsequent offering, the new shares are usually issued from the company's treasury, and the net offering proceeds go the company. Since a subsequent offering increases the company's shares outstanding, it has a dilutive effect, i.e., it dilutes the stakes of existing shareholders.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Subsequent Offering'

A company may seek to complete a subsequent offering for a number of reasons. Investment demand for its shares may be high even after the initial offering, or it may look to raise capital to capitalize on new opportunities. Another reason could be that the company is looking to bolster its cash reserves at an opportune time, because it foresees funding challenges ahead. This may especially be the case for development-stage technology and biotechnology companies, which often have huge capital requirements in the initial years.

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