Substantial Gainful Activity - SGA


DEFINITION of 'Substantial Gainful Activity - SGA'

The threshold prescribed by the Social Security Administration (SSA) for determining eligibility for Social Security benefits. Substantial gainful activity (SGA) is a specified dollar amount. It is updated each year to reflect inflation, and it represents the minimum level of employability which will render a person productive and, therefore, ineligible for Social Security benefits. The SSA employs higher threshold levels of SGA for persons with specific disabilities, such as blindness.

BREAKING DOWN 'Substantial Gainful Activity - SGA'

For the year 2006, the SSA has set the SGA amount for individuals at $860 per month. This means that any individual who is able to engage in employment earning more than $860 per month will be ineligible for benefits. For blind persons, a higher SGA amount of $1,450 was set for 2006.

Once the SSA approves disability benefits for a given citizen, it allows that person to continue to receive benefits for a brief period even if he or she is successfully able to re-enter the workforce and earn more than the SGA amount each month. This is intended to provide an incentive for disabled people to seek gainful employment and re-enter the workforce in a different capacity for the long term.

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  1. Are all disabilities treated the same for Substantial Gainful Activity (SGA) thresholds?

    Section 520 of the Social Security Act indicates that U.S. citizens are eligible to receive disability benefits if they are ... Read Full Answer >>
  2. How does the Social Security Administration determine the Substantial Gainful Activity ...

    A disabled individual is eligible to receive disability benefits from the Social Security Administration (SSA) if he earns ... Read Full Answer >>
  3. What is Substantial Gainful Activity (SGA) and why is it important?

    Substantial gainful activity (SGA) is what the Social Security Administration (SSA) measures to determine work, income and ... Read Full Answer >>
  4. How is Substantial Gainful Activity (SGA) calculated for those who own their own ...

    Substantial gainful activity (SGA) is a key phrase used by the Social Security Administration (SSA) in relation to determining ... Read Full Answer >>
  5. Are Cafeteria plans exempt from Social Security?

    Typically, qualified benefits offered through cafeteria plans are exempt from Social Security taxes. However, certain types ... Read Full Answer >>
  6. Why would someone change their Social Security number?

    In general, the Social Security Administration, or SSA, does not encourage citizens to change their Social Security numbers, ... Read Full Answer >>

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