Sunshine Trade

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DEFINITION of 'Sunshine Trade'

A high-volume transaction prematurely revealed to the market before the order is even entered. A sunshine trade is one which just due to the size of the position being taken, a move in the market will result. By revealing some or all of the specifics of the trade, the market can readily prepare itself for the outcome, rather than causing a giant ripple in the market place.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Sunshine Trade'

Sunshine trades are meant to reduce confusion and speculation by investors by making the large transactions more transparent. This transparency leads to markets which are considered more reliable and "fair." An example of the opposite of a sunshine trade would be dark pool trading, where most traders do not know who is trading or the size of the transactions.

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