Super Currency

AAA

DEFINITION of 'Super Currency'

A supranational currency printed by the International Monetary Fund (IMF) that would be tied to a basket of reserve currencies. The concept of a global "super currency" has been periodically discussed between world leaders as well as endorsed by 2001 Nobel Memorial Prize-winner Joseph Stiglitz and well-known business leader George Soros for years. A super currency could also be tied to a single currency, but the interconnectedness of world financial markets and concerns about the volatility that can occur as a result of the system being tied to one currency have made this idea much less popular.

BREAKING DOWN 'Super Currency'

Super-currency proponents have called for the IMF to use its special drawing rights (SDRs) - an internal international accounting system for IMF countries - to create a global super currency. The SDR was created in 1969 as a result of the Bretton Woods fixed exchange rate and is a global reserve asset based on a basket of existing currencies.

One of the most critical concerns surrounding the creation of a super currency is that the introduction of new legal tender worldwide could be a catalyst for inflation. It could also potentially weaken individual countries' currencies and usurp or complicate the functioning of existing governing financial institutions.

RELATED TERMS
  1. International Monetary Fund - IMF

    An international organization created for the purpose of standardizing ...
  2. General Agreements To Borrow - ...

    A borrowing/lending medium for members of the Group of Ten. Members ...
  3. Special Drawing Rights - SDR

    An international type of monetary reserve currency, created by ...
  4. Currency Basket

    A selected group of currencies in which the weighted average ...
  5. USD

    In currencies, this is the abbreviation for the U.S. dollar. ...
  6. Bretton Woods Agreement

    A landmark system for monetary and exchange rate management established ...
Related Articles
  1. Personal Finance

    Examining Credit Crunches Around The World

    Market tops and bottoms have proliferated the financial markets throughout history. Learn how countries dealt with these tough economic periods.
  2. Forex Education

    Global Trade And The Currency Market

    Learn how the Bretton Woods system got the ball rolling for world trade.
  3. Fundamental Analysis

    An Introduction To The International Monetary Fund (IMF)

    Chances are you've heard of the IMF. But what does it do, and why is it so controversial?
  4. Personal Finance

    What Is The Bank For International Settlements?

    Get the scoop on the structure and functions of the oldest global financial institution.
  5. Investing Basics

    What's Current Portion of Long-Term Debt?

    The current portion of long-term debt is the part of a company’s long-term debt that must be repaid within the next year.
  6. Economics

    Explaining Cost Control

    For a business, cost control entails managing and reducing expenses.
  7. Economics

    Understanding the Bretton Woods Agreement

    The Bretton Woods Agreement is a famous international monetary agreement that came out of a meeting of the UN Monetary and Financial Conference.
  8. Economics

    Explaining Accounting Conservatism

    Accounting conservatism is a principal that requires accounting rules be applied with high degrees of verification.
  9. Term

    What are Non-GAAP Earnings?

    Non-GAAP earnings are a company’s earnings that are not reported according to Generally Accepted Accounting Principles.
  10. Active Trading Fundamentals

    This Is How 3 Investors Made a Billion Dollars

    Read about three major hedge fund managers who are worth at least $1 billion and who made large amounts of money on a single trade idea.
RELATED FAQS
  1. How do dividends affect the balance sheet?

    Dividends paid in cash affect a company's balance sheet by decreasing the company's cash account on the asset side and decreasing ... Read Full Answer >>
  2. Are dividends considered an expense?

    Cash or stock dividends distributed to shareholders are not considered an expense on a company's income statement. Stock ... Read Full Answer >>
  3. Do dividends go on the balance sheet?

    The only account recorded on the balance sheet, when dividends are declared and before they are paid out to a company's shareholders, ... Read Full Answer >>
  4. What are some examples of general and administrative expenses?

    In accounting, general and administrative expenses represent the necessary costs to maintain a company's daily operations ... Read Full Answer >>
  5. How do dividend distributions affect additional paid in capital?

    Whether a dividend distribution has any effect on additional paid-in capital depends solely on what type of dividend is issued: ... Read Full Answer >>
  6. Why can additional paid in capital never have a negative balance?

    The additional paid-in capital figure on a company's balance sheet can never be negative because companies do not pay investors ... Read Full Answer >>

You May Also Like

Hot Definitions
  1. Depreciation

    1. A method of allocating the cost of a tangible asset over its useful life. Businesses depreciate long-term assets for both ...
  2. Recession

    A significant decline in activity across the economy, lasting longer than a few months. It is visible in industrial production, ...
  3. Bubble Theory

    A school of thought that believes that the prices of assets can temporarily rise far above their true values and that these ...
  4. Stock Market Crash

    A rapid and often unanticipated drop in stock prices. A stock market crash can be the result of major catastrophic events, ...
  5. Financial Crisis

    A situation in which the value of financial institutions or assets drops rapidly. A financial crisis is often associated ...
  6. Election Period

    The period of time during which an investor who owns an extendable or retractable bond must indicate to the issuer whether ...
Trading Center
×

You are using adblocking software

Want access to all of Investopedia? Add us to your “whitelist”
so you'll never miss a feature!