Supranational

What is 'Supranational'

Supranational is an international organization, or union, whereby member states transcend national boundaries or interests to share in the decision-making and vote on issues pertaining to the wider grouping.

BREAKING DOWN 'Supranational'

The European Union and the World Trade Organization are both supranationals. In the EU, each member votes on policy that will affect each member nation. The benefits of this construct for the EU are the synergies derived from social and economic policies along with a stronger presence on the international stage.

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