Suriname Guilders

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DEFINITION of 'Suriname Guilders'

The official currency of Suriname until 2004, when it was replaced by the Suriname dollar. Each Suriname dollar replaced 1,000 Suriname guilders. The coins that represented fractions of one guilder remained in use, but instead represented the same fraction of one Suriname dollar. Suriname suffers from problems with inflation, excessive government spending, tax increases and currency devaluation.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Suriname Guilders'

A former Dutch colony, Suriname is a poor country located on the northern coast of South America and bordered by Brazil in the south, Guyana in the west and French Guiana in the east. Its economy relies heavily on gold, alumina and oil mining, and is sensitive to changes in world commodity prices.

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