Swap Transferring Risk With Participating Element - STRIPE

AAA

DEFINITION of 'Swap Transferring Risk With Participating Element - STRIPE'

A specific type of hedging technique. STRIPEs combine interest rate swaps and interest rate caps in order to protect the borrower from changes in interest rates. Under this arrangement, the balance of a loan is split between a fixed rate and a floating rate with a cap.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Swap Transferring Risk With Participating Element - STRIPE'

STRIPEs provide a partial hedge to interest rate changes in either direction. If rates increase, the lender will profit from the portion of the loan covered by the cap. If they fall, then the lender, who would take a fixed-rate receiver position, would also be protected against a loss.

RELATED TERMS
  1. Interest Rate Swap

    An agreement between two parties (known as counterparties) where ...
  2. Forward Swap

    A swap agreement created through the synthesis of two swaps differing ...
  3. Currency Swap

    A swap that involves the exchange of principal and interest in ...
  4. Swap Rate

    The rate of the fixed portion of a swap as determined by its ...
  5. Swap

    Traditionally, the exchange of one security for another to change ...
  6. Inverse Transaction

    A transaction that can cancel out a forward contract that has ...
RELATED FAQS
  1. What is an absolute rate?

    An absolute rate is easy to understand once you know the basics of an interest rate swap. An absolute rate is the fixed rate ... Read Full Answer >>
  2. How do companies benefit from interest rate and currency swaps?

    An interest rate swap involves the exchange of cash flows between two parties based on interest payments for a particular ... Read Full Answer >>
  3. How can I spot trading opportunities looking at year-to-date (YTD) performance?

    Trading opportunities on the long side can be spotted by looking at stocks with the worst year-to-date (YTD) performance, ... Read Full Answer >>
  4. How does Net Operating Profit After Tax give a clearer view of the operating efficiency ...

    Net operating profit after tax (NOPAT) gives a clearer view of the operating efficiency of a company. While NOPAT is a measure ... Read Full Answer >>
  5. Which is better: dollar cost averaging or value averaging?

    Historical comparisons seem to indicate that value averaging (VA) tends to outperform dollar cost averaging (DCA), offering ... Read Full Answer >>
  6. How are commodity spot prices different than futures prices?

    Commodity spot prices and futures prices are different quotes for different types of contracts. The spot price is the current ... Read Full Answer >>
Related Articles
  1. Options & Futures

    An Introduction To Swaps

    Learn how these derivatives work and how companies can benefit from them.
  2. Active Trading

    How Companies Use Derivatives To Hedge Risk

    Derivatives can reduce the risks associated with changes in foreign exchange rates, interest rates and commodity prices.
  3. Chart Advisor

    How Investors are Profiting from Cyber Crime Fear

    An ETF that has seen significant gains this year in the growing field of cyber security, and the threat and fear of cyber attacks and cyber crime.
  4. Investing Basics

    What Does Spot Price Mean?

    Spot price is the current price at which a security may be bought or sold.
  5. Economics

    Understanding Limited Liability

    Limited liability is a legal concept that protects equity owners from personal losses due to their ownership interest in the company.
  6. Fundamental Analysis

    Explaining the Empirical Rule

    The empirical rule provides a quick estimate of the spread of data in a normal statistical distribution.
  7. Economics

    Explaining Demographics

    Demographics is the study and categorization of people based on factors such as income level, education, gender, race, age, and employment.
  8. Fundamental Analysis

    Calculating Degree of Financial Leverage

    Degree of financial leverage (DFL) is a metric that measures the sensitivity of a company’s operating income due to changes in its capital structure.
  9. Investing Basics

    What Does a Clearing House Do?

    A clearing house is a third-party agency or separate entity that acts as a go-between for buyers and sellers in financial markets.
  10. Economics

    What Does Capital Intensive Mean?

    Capital intensive refers to a business or industry that requires a substantial amount of money or financial resources to engage in its specific business.

You May Also Like

Hot Definitions
  1. Bund

    A bond issued by Germany's federal government, or the German word for "bond." Bunds are the German equivalent of U.S. Treasury ...
  2. European Central Bank - ECB

    The central bank responsible for the monetary system of the European Union (EU) and the euro currency. The bank was formed ...
  3. Quantitative Easing

    An unconventional monetary policy in which a central bank purchases private sector financial assets in order to lower interest ...
  4. Current Account Deficit

    A measurement of a country’s trade in which the value of goods and services it imports exceeds the value of goods and services ...
  5. International Monetary Fund - IMF

    An international organization created for the purpose of: 1. Promoting global monetary and exchange stability. 2. Facilitating ...
  6. Risk-Return Tradeoff

    The principle that potential return rises with an increase in risk. Low levels of uncertainty (low-risk) are associated with ...
Trading Center
×

You are using adblocking software

Want access to all of Investopedia? Add us to your “whitelist”
so you'll never miss a feature!