Swap

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DEFINITION of 'Swap'

Traditionally, the exchange of one security for another to change the maturity (bonds), quality of issues (stocks or bonds), or because investment objectives have changed. Recently, swaps have grown to include currency swaps and interest rate swaps.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Swap'

If firms in separate countries have comparative advantages on interest rates, then a swap could benefit both firms. For example, one firm may have a lower fixed interest rate, while another has access to a lower floating interest rate. These firms could swap to take advantage of the lower rates.

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RELATED FAQS
  1. What is the difference between derivatives and swaps?

    Derivatives are securities with prices dependent on one or multiple underlying assets. Common derivatives include forward ... Read Full Answer >>
  2. What kinds of derivatives are types of forward commitments?

    A derivative is a type of security in which the price of the security is dependent on underlying assets. A derivative could ... Read Full Answer >>
  3. How does an entrepreneur choose a business structure?

    Swaps are derivative contracts between two parties that involve the exchange of cash flows. Interest rate swaps involve exchanging ... Read Full Answer >>
  4. When was the first swap agreement and why were swaps created?

    Swap agreements originated from agreements created in Great Britain in the 1970s to circumvent foreign exchange controls ... Read Full Answer >>
  5. How are swap agreements financed?

    Since swap agreements involve the exchange of future cash flows and are initially set at zero, there is no real financing ... Read Full Answer >>
  6. What are the risks involved with swaps?

    The main risks associated with interest rate swaps, which are the most common type of swap, are interest rate risk and counterparty ... Read Full Answer >>
  7. What are the Securities and Exchange Commission regulations regarding swaps?

    The U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) was granted the authority to regulate security-based swaps (SBS) by Title ... Read Full Answer >>
  8. What would motivate an entity to enter into a swap agreement?

    The main purpose of swap agreements is to swap cash flows between counterparties for a certain market or asset. Generally, ... Read Full Answer >>
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