Sweet Crude

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DEFINITION of 'Sweet Crude'

A type of oil that meets certain content requirements, including low levels of hydrogen sulfide and carbon dioxide. Sweet crude gets its name if it contains less than 0.5% sulfur. Refiners prefer sweet crudes because of the low sulfur content and relatively elevated yields of high-value products, including gasoline, diesel fuel, heating oil and jet fuel.

BREAKING DOWN 'Sweet Crude'

Light sweet crude oil (WTI) futures and options are the most actively traded energy products in the world. WTI helps manage risk in the energy sector because the contract has the most liquidity, highest number of customers and excellent transparency. Both full-sized and e-mini futures contracts are traded on through the CME Group's CME Globex, CME ClearPort and Open Outcry (New York) trading venues.

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