Swing For The Fences

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DEFINITION

To attempt to earn large returns in the stock market. The term "swing for the fences" has its origins in baseball. Batters who swing for the fences are trying to hit the ball over the fence to score a home run. Similarly, investors who "swing for the fences" are attempting to hit a financial home run and make lots of money.



INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS

The expression "swing for the fences" can also be used to refer to the making of a large and potentially risky business decision. For example, a CEO might swing for the fences and try to acquire his company's biggest competitor. When an attempt to swing for the fences fails, the baseball metaphor continues, with the failure referred to as "striking out".




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