Symmetrical Distribution

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DEFINITION of 'Symmetrical Distribution'

A situation in which the values of variables occur at regular frequencies, and the mean, median and mode occur at the same point. Unlike asymmetrical distribution, symmetrical distribution does not skew. A symmetrical distribution is commonly shaped like a bell curve when depicted on a graph. If a line is drawn down the middle of the graph, the two sides will mirror each other.


Also called a "symmetric distribution" or "normal distribution".

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Symmetrical Distribution'

A type of symmetrical distribution that is not shaped like a bell curve is a bimodal symmetric distribution. This graph is shaped like two bell curves placed side by side. The two sides of this graph still mirror each other; however, only the mean and median occur at the same point - the center of the graph. The modes occur at two points: the highest point in each of the two bell curves.

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