Syndicate Bid

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DEFINITION of 'Syndicate Bid'

A bid that can be entered in the Nasdaq system to stabilize the price of a Nasdaq security prior to the date of a secondary offering.

BREAKING DOWN 'Syndicate Bid'

A secondary offering increases the float. Therefore, stock prices of that security may fluctuate; a syndicate bid tries to stabilize this.

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